Hard to believe that I have been shooting concerts for 4 decades now, beginning in the mid 70's when I went to my first concert at the world famous  Madison Square Garden in New York City.  I felt at home among the walls of speakers and the towering lighting rigs,  I also  immediately knew that leaving the show with a ticket stub, program and maybe a t-shirt would not be enough, so I had to capture the memory permanently. Within' weeks I had traded my Sony home stereo system for a black leather jacket and my first Minolta SLR camera. After a brief learning period experimenting with the constantly changing lighting and vast array of colors, film speeds and the quick movements of the artists, I was told by many people that I was a "natural". I have always felt that "knowing" the music deeply and being passionate about it as well, really was the "secret" to capturing the "moment".  With that confidence, I was soon shooting many concerts, 46 in 1980 alone. By then I was also being published in many major magazines as well. In the early days, I practiced "gorilla type tactics" to get my equipment into the venue's. Later, I was forced to play the game of securing credentials in order to shoot shows. All too soon,  promoter and band management rules and demands on photographers began to take the excitement out of shooting shows. Then the " first 3 song" rule became common, NO more pictures after the third song. Pro concert photographers know that the "best" part of a shows production comes later in the event. Well, as the famous west coast photographer Jim Marshall once stated, "Let me do my damn job".